Big strides at the tapestry loom

It seems to me I only ever post when grounded by something, this time a chest infection and stinking cold. I don’t trust my brain enough to allow myself anywhere near the loom but today at least I am going to trust myself at the keyboard.

When last we talked I had just finished the Lamentation tapestry. In an attempt to paint my life in as rosy a glow as possible as Pinterest, Instagram et al demands, what I may have failed to mention is that it totally messed with my head.

It was a throwback, I had to produce something ASAP and I had plenty of warp sleyed at the right sett. What I really wanted to do, of course, was get on experimenting with a new weaving style inspired by my Churchill Fellowship. But the Lamentation tapestry, I liked it, I enjoyed weaving it, and it has taken me time and angst to develop my own style of weaving – was I doing the right thing turning my back on it.

Despite my doubts next due on the loom was a ‘straighter’, less painterly tapestry, and so I dressed the loom with a warp wide enough to start expanding samples beyond just the faces I had done before. The cartoon was based on an earlier piece but I doubled the weft to try to to save time. I enjoyed the process of weaving her, it was a more considered and involved process. I wanted to get at the crispness of medieval tapestry and although everything is laid bare technique-wise, and there was no where to hide, I liked having to rely on just the warp and weft, none of the gimmicks I might have pulled before. It made me feel I rather bashed out my other work, able to hide behind the randomness of it.

As she progressed I could appreciate her technically, but I started to question where I could take work like this artistically. I just couldn’t see it in other work of mine, how I could take her forward into bigger, full-sized work. I couldn’t see how to make it relevant. Ever since I started my Fellowship I have been aware of the fine line between being inspired by the medieval skills of tapestry weavers, without going all doublet and hose in the production of my own, and I think I was fearful that was where I was heading and it froze me. And whilst I was embracing the formality of this type of weaving, there was still a part of me that questioned whether I missed that expressive element I thought I had finally found.The doubled weft hadn’t worked so I knew I needed to do another sample to rectify that and as there was enough warp I started another piece. It was a chance to be sure it wasn’t working, and to try a few other things like lettering.But again, it just wasn’t doing it for me on an artistic level. I started to wonder if there was a way to amalgamate this technical progress I had made with my darker creative leanings, and that seemed to go ok at the sketchbook, but by now I was heading into a complete creative implosion. Do I keep trying to make this ‘straighter’ style work, if so, how? Or do I go back to the bigger, blended, more painterly work I was familiar with and comfortable with

Fortunately, I know some great craftspeople and artists and there’s one in particular, Liz Samways, whose judgement and honesty I trust implicitly and I was able to browbeat her into meeting with me for a few hours mentoring over lunch in Salts Mill. What a privilege it is to be able to spill one’s brains on a table and have someone help you scoop them all up again. Together we were able to unpick how I’ve got into to my mess, and we were able to map a way out. It was, of course, all rather obvious in the end, I have actually got my weaving to do what I wanted to do, I just hadn’t seen it and a lot of that was a failure in me to commit to it.

So it was snip, snip snip, off with the half-finished tapestry and a new warp was put on the loom, and a fresh mindset installed in me. Three things from our conversation in particular came to the fore as I sat at the blank pages of my sketchbook, 1) that whilst I want to weave with some expression, that was already there, just not in the way that I thought it was – it was in the figures themselves, not in the way I weave I them 2) that what I draw isn’t actually rubbish straight off the bat, it is doing what I want, if only I’d give it a chance 3) yes I have worked hard to develop a particular style, but if I am not going to be true to the findings of my research, then what was the point of doing it?A new cartoon emerged quickly, and interestingly I did it the old fashioned way, huge pieces of paper taped to the wall, and I worked with rulers and pencils, just as when I started out, rather than digitally, and it felt raw and satisfying. I began weaving a cropped area of the larger cartoon as a sample. I know it will seem to strange to anyone not intimately familiar with my brain, as they will be wondering how different this new piece really is from the tapestry I began this post with, but there has been a massive change in how I am approaching it intellectually and creatively as well as technically and I can see a future with it too, swimming with ideas, in fact.The first sample was just a sample, this new piece is the start of something. And whilst sitting in your pants on your sofa reading this the wood is clearly discernible from the trees, I assure you, when it is you all caught up in the brambles and with the wolves howling a few feet away, it is jolly difficult. Now I have committed I feel all parts of me come together, the academic, the medieval (wonderfully free of doublet and hose), the archaeologist, the artist, and the weaver, both technically and creatively – and it feels great.

I had made a good start on the tapestry when I had to go to London for the annual conference of the Heritage Crafts Association. I went down the day before to spend some quality time at the V&A and their tapestry collections on display.If I am completely honest, it proved rather emotional. I dashed into there a couple of years ago between meetings. I realised then I would never be able to call myself a weaver unless I learned more about the skills that went into those tapestries, that I would have to study tapestries first hand. Books just weren’t going to take me where I wanted to go as a weaver. It was a sad moment, because I knew I would never get to see such tapestries. I simply did not have the resources.
And yet there I was once again, having seen tapestries across Europe and the US thanks to the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust. I saw the tapestries again entirely differently, I was able to read them, understand them, work out the techniques at play, and learn from them, and I was able to see them in relation to my own work.I love that there is nothing in my new work that isn’t in the fifteenth century Devonshire hunting tapestries and without it being pastiche. Different wool, dyes and warp of course, and I as a weaver am still alive in my forties and have my own teeth (I would also say I was plague free, but that is a damned lie). In fact I can see that everything I have studied over the last year is in this tapestry. I love that to me it seems honest, I have finally found my peace with tapestry and with myself and that opens the door to exciting things in the future. I have grown up, I have graduated. What has certainly helped is a bit of space to experiment instead of having to make work for events without breathing. In a few weeks I’ll be on the plane to Germany and then Switzerland for the last leg of my Fellowship. Good god, I hope it doesn’t unbalance me as much as the first two legs! I suppose it will defy the purpose entirely if I go study more medieval tapestry through fingers over my eyes!

In among all this I have had the prepare the Lamentation for exhibition at the Platform Gallery in Clitheroe. I was awarded the Selector’s Prize for Innovation at last year’s Craft Open and part of the prize was to display my work this year. I took the tapestry over this week and got a sneak peak at the work destined for display and it is clear it is going to be a great exhibition. It opens on April 14 and runs til June 23. I am also pleased to say I got selected for Art in the Pen later in the year, and so this new body of work will be destined for that and I can’t wait.

I have heaps to do to get ready for Germany and Switzerland and of course this damn plague to get rid of, but I hope to get back to the new tapestry as soon as possible and finish it. It has been a couple of days now of self-imposed exile from the loom, and I can feel the ache for it in my marrow.

 

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A new tapestry and some morphine hanging from a loom – a slightly adventurous Christmas

I think I would have mentioned before that however much I enjoy doing events, I do feel I am cycling backwards in order to make work for them, especially last year when sales have been so good. The downside is I just do not have the time or space to experiment. I’ve also felt it keenly as I have had a year of exposure to such wonderful things and my mind is swimming with ideas and things I want to try. When such experiments can take months, the risks are obvious.

I don’t usually do Christmas, my family are in the Midlands and I tend to just work through. But as the holidays approached I found my productivity slowing, I am loving the tapestry I am working on but was barely weaving in a day what would normally take a few hours. I accepted a break would do me good and as the rest of the nation were sitting on the sofa in their pants, their face dropped into a tin of Quality Street I, goddamn it, would do the same. I banned myself from the workroom for two weeks. Not to step across its threshold. Oh no. Banned from the loom. I could only look upon it from the hallway, lovingly, longingly, but we were to be parted.

I ain’t got no PhD for nuffin. After a couple of days of spring cleaning and fighting through brain fog to amalgamate my to dos I suddenly realised, yes I was banned from the workroom, but I could set up a sample loom in the living room. I know, total genius. Whilst I have been comfortable in the medieval techniques I have been working on this year, high up on my list of things I wanted to do was to apply those techniques to a more modern design rather than the faux-medieval visages I had been doing. I already had a cartoon, although it had been intended for the more darker, blended style, and after an hour to rejig it I ran into the workroom for a handful of yarn and warp and set up the sample loom downstairs. It was mid-sized, and actually one I would have used as an undergraduate; I was the very happy custodian of various textile equipment from my archaeological department.

The frame was just the right size to rest against the arm of the sofa and my lap and so I worked on it horizontally. This was a new experience for me, as I usually work on a vertical warp and it took time, each warp needed to be picked out by hand, but it was enjoyable. The only issue was some abdominal pain, which I assumed was my bent over posture, William Morris’s weavers I remember reading somewhere were plagued with it. Oh how I laugh.

It is still hard to let go of the ‘fuss’ of my old style and to embrace the simpleness and crispness of this type of tapestry, but I do rather love it, and I am dying to have the time to get beyond these small samples. I am working on a design inspired by a line from my great-great-grandmother’s records from the asylum she was kept in, something she said, it is like hearing her voice, I think it is a reference to a Victorian song.

I had a few more attacks of pain under my rib cage, one on Christmas night when I was so convinced I was going to die I got dressed for the sake of the poor sod who was going to find my body once its whiff paraded down the street. I didn’t want to make a fuss this time of year, the NHS is overwhelmed afterall and booked to see my GP in January. But eventually I ended up being taken to hospital by ambulance with suspected pancreatitis or a gallstone jammed somewhere it shouldn’t be. My biggest regret is not getting a snap of the IVF and morphine drip hanging off the dismantled scaffold loom in the living room. Also, irritatingly, my ASBO neighbours were very helpful getting the ambulance and I am still not entirely sure of the etiquette – do I owe them a thank you card or can I just pretend it never happened?

It all turned out to be down to a stoopid liver condition I found out about last year. I am a bit peeved as I had no idea this was part of the deal and decidedly want my money back. But a few days in hospital and rest at home did mean I got, afterall, a break over the holidays. Except I did manage to do my tax return. What can I say, I am a bloody hero.

It did mean though I was massively behind on adminy things and once up to it I had to clear the decks of all that before I could creep back into my beloved, much missed, abandoned workroom. I know many weavers see it as a contemplative, meditative act, and yes I can find myself ‘zoning out’, but to me it is work – I do it to produce a piece of work, not for the act itself. But it has shocked me how much my loom contributes to my sense of wellness. Getting to the point where I could just sit at it and work has been like a tiny island in a vast sea. I’m there now, this blog and some planning for the next leg of my Churchill Fellowship aside, and it feels good to have my bum planted firmly in the sand under the shade of the solitary palm tree. Whether it is that meditative aspect, or the repetition, or the familiarity, or the structure, or the sense of purpose, alludes me, but I do know we are wedded now (to be clear, in a metaphorical way, not a pervy way) .

I’ve learned a lot, my friends rallied around marvelously and I now acknowledge I do need to accept help more often than I tended to do. I have also realised I have to get on and weave what I want to weave, rather than live in a panic about making things I feel have to, otherwise, really, what is the point? Life is too goddamn short.

New tapestry underway – Two Marys, possibly three!

I hope you appreciate I am having to lift my fingertips from under my hot waterbottle warmed blankets to type this. As the UK welcomes(?) some early snow it seemed a good time to get comfy on the sofa and update this blog. I cannot apologise enough for yet another delay, but the truth is I have had my head down working on a brand new tapestry.

There has been an elephant in my workroom over the last year. As per my last post I feel I have made some strides and am looking forward to pushing things further, but it has been a year of samples and small tapestries, always in the shadow of my main loom and an abandoned project on it, the warp my older size and sett, so of little use in the direction I want to go. I knew I could ease it off the loom and store it but I suspected it would just get abused and unused and it seemed a bit of a waste. Fantastically my tapestry Might Have Been, on show at the Cartwright Hall Art Gallery as part of Bradford Open has sold (thank you, whoever you are, if you see this!). I had earmarked it for an exhibition I am doing early next year and needed to make a replacement piece and PDQ. I have only ever woven single figures before, but have always wanted to try to weave more; one figure is just a figure, but two is a story. Stylistically the resulting cartoon is a bit of a backward step for me, but it does enable me to use that warp and not waste it.

The narrative aspect of tapestry is what appeals to me and this got reinforced during my travels. Most medieval tapestries I saw were biblical in theme, and I came across a fair smattering of one or more Marys weeping at the crucifixion or its aftermath, and of course such images were rife in the Byzantine and more recent murals I saw in Bulgaria. I am in no way religious myself, but I felt a need to weave my own version but with a more defiant and accusatory stance, Mary the mother, and Mary Magdalene the follower or whatever she was, looking out of the tapestry at the viewer, at us the murderers. As historical figures we know so little about them, they are ephemeral, fragments, whispers, and I felt that might suit my old style of weaving, with the figures half transparent.

Biblical Marys were traditionally depicted in threes (there were loads of others in the entourage apparently) and although there was a third figure in my original drawing I decided to lop her off as the warp wouldn’t be wide enough. But I soon realised there was still a third Mary in there through me as the weaver; Mary is my middle name. Through these figures I too am looking out at the killer of my brother and whilst it always shocks me how personal my tapestries can become, I suppose if I don’t have part of me in them, there’s little point devoting the extraordinary amount of time they demand. Of course I didn’t intend for this to be yet another tapestry about that, but it has happened unconsciously. The time from the initial sketch, drawing the cartoon, colour sampling and pulling out the old tapestry on the loom couldn’t have been more than a week, so there was clearly little doubt that this was what needed to be woven.

I have just reached the half way point, pretty much working on a loom-bed-loom pattern as I did this time last year. I actually enjoy it, feeling sequestered and focused. But although I am putting ridiculous hours in I am surprised I haven’t got further, I am wondering if I am not as quick now as I was twelve months ago. Although I have been rubbish updating things here, I have been able to post updates on Instagram, so do find me over there if you are interested in seeing the project develop. There’s even videos!

In the meantime heaps of other things have been going on – did I say I had been sequestered? The Ilkley Arts Trail was fantastic. The Manor House was a bit of a squeeze but there was great camaraderie among the exhibitors and it was fabulously well organised.

I also got selected for the Craven Arts Christmas Exhibition which will run until 23rd December at the Exhibition Gallery in Skipton Town Hall. It is a great show, lots of really good quality pieces and it is certainly worth popping in. I did a stint there yesterday in the gallery and sold a lovely painting to a lovely couple. I got to put the red dot on, it was very exciting.

I also did a talk on my Fellowship so far to the Bradford Guild of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers, who are just about the loveliest folk you can imagine, and again I had a great time and it was good putting the talk together and reliving my trips, I am itching to get on with the next leg.

I also had a massive clear out of my workroom. I had always tried to make it a cosy space, somewhere I wanted to spend time, but after experiencing the calm and clarity of a weaver’s workroom in Bulgaria I decided to redistribute the tables, chairs and bookcases, and layers of nonsense that had accumulated on the walls to make it much more bare, so it is just me and the loom, and it has made a lot of difference being able to spread out when it comes to sorting yarns and drawing cartoons, and I suppose more focused on the job in hand. Although I do often get the feeling I am being watched……

Tomorrow I begin the second half of the new tapestry. But today I am on short-listing duty as one of the judges for the Heritage Crafts Association’s suite of awards. The HCA has been in the press a great deal this year with the publication of its HCA/Radcliffe Red List of Endangered Crafts. The HCA is offering an award funded by the Marsh Christian Trust to safeguard crafts and the deadline isn’t until mid-January, so do have a look if you think you might be eligible.

Right, my hot water bottles need re-doing. Ttfn x

A summer of tapestry faces

It has been a tremendously fruitful time not having any events since the Saltaire Arts Trail, it has given me the space to experiment and try to consolidate my ideas and at the same time make new pieces for Art in the Pen in a couple of weeks, and to try to deal with all the things I have seen on my Fellowship so far.

The first thing I did was to decide not to try to squeeze in a new large piece for Art in the Pen. It was a tough decision, but I would have lost months to making something for the sake of it, and I knew what I needed to do was samples, samples, samples. I re-wove some of the tapestries that sold at the Saltaire Arts Trail. I wanted to make sure they weren’t a fluke. It was an interesting experience weaving on a cartoon I had already woven, but it meant I could change a few things I wasn’t happy with. My experience at the Arts Trail confirmed the sort of tapestries I want to make, and key to that is being able to weave figures and so I decided to try to push these face samples further.

Chrissie Freeth Tapestry Face Sample 3

When the time came to push them further and scale them up, I found myself hesitating, not trusting the designs enough to spend precious warp on either of my main looms, but my simple frame loom was too small to scale things up. There was an issue too with my ceiling falling down but the loom in the living room escaped by an inch.

I ended up with a sudden notion to make my own frame loom, it would cause much less loom waste and thus easier to justify trialling larger pieces. Perhaps a little crazy considering I never used a drill before and the use of anything with a sharp edge usually results in a visit to A&E. Nonetheless I girded my bobbins and headed down the canal tow-path to the local DIY shop. I brought two lengths of rough wood and chopped one in half to make the sides and cut from another length two pieces for the top and bottom. I joined the pieces using brackets although I do now have an urge to drill holes in everything. I added a paper ruler to the bottom and top and added a heddle bar hanging from clamps. I hitched the first set of leashes on and they were a pain in the a**e, whenever I wanted to move the heddle bar they got stuck and had to be guided up the warp one by one. I reverted to split rings the second time and they were a marvel. It took some time to find the right position to sit at the loom, but by the second warp I had got it down pat, and it is risking becoming my favourite loom and not least because I can get the tension just how I like it, rather than being at the mercy of the position of the teeth on the more complicated looms.

DIY Loom 1

DIY Loom 2

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The first piece I made was a bit of a chore, partly because of the leashes and the uncomfortableness of the level of the fell and my seat.

Chrissie Freeth Tapestry Face Sample 4

During all this time I had been living off diplofenac, codeine, cold tea and multiple tips to my fabulous dentist for an abscess that was not there and it looks like I may or may not have damaged a nerve into my face instead. The truth is I have been doubled up with the pain, suspecting at one point my eye was going to come out. Just imagine having every tooth on one side of your gob being drilled at the same time without anaesthetic and you’ll be pretty much there. Quite pee’d off that this was going to be a long game rather than solved with the whipping out of a tooth, I drew something a little darker, loved it and got it onto the DIY loom. This has taken a good few days to weave too, but it has been an utter delight, working well past midnight and not minding it a jot. I do feel this is much more me, darker and less twee and harks back to the blending techniques that I used in No Longer Mourn, but with some of the things I have learned during the preceding samples thrown in.

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I am having to abandon the loom for a couple of weeks to do all the practical things necessary to get ready for Art in the Pen. It takes place in Skipton on the 12th and 13th of August and is now easily one of the largest art events of the north with just shy of a couple of hundred selected artists exhibiting under one roof. The cattle stalls of the auction market are given over to the artists to turn into micro galleries. It is in no way a stuck-up event, there is absolutely no pressure to buy , so it makes a great and very different day out, so do come along.

Bradford Open

I am also very pleased to say one of my tapestries got selected for for the Bradford Open 2017 at the Cartwright Hall Art Gallery. It runs until November 12th and is a great opportunity to see the new Hockney Gallery there that has just opened. Anyway, hope to see you in Skipton, do come say hello! x

New new tapestry!

If you are a regular follower of this blog, you’ll know it has taken a long time for me to find a way to weave that is unique to me and which gives me a way to say what I want to. The last tapestry, No Longer Mourn, was a bit of a breakthrough. All I had to do next, was do it again. Was it, perhaps, a fluke?

I had plenty of warp left over so I was quick to make another cartoon and to get it on the loom. The design was something I’ve been playing with for a good while but couldn’t quite get it how I wanted it, but now, with this new way of thinking I was able to create a version I liked pretty quickly. I suppose in my head it is about strength in the face of regret, but no real title as yet. It is pretty nerve-wracking unwinding the beams and seeing the completed tapestry for the first time, but I have to say I was pleased with the result and I sat down and looked at it with a sense that I have finally found my feet as a weaver and as an artist. I know what I want to do – and I know now exactly how to do it. I’ve got more ideas and designs in my head and in my notebooks than I’ll ever probably have enough lifespan left to weave. This is a massive change and relief for me (not the lifespan thing). I feel in some way, like I am just starting out.

woven tapestry

This tapestry was woven in a slightly different way technically to the last and once they are both cut off the loom I’ll go into a bit more detail about that. This tapestry is destined, as with the last one, to go to the Saltaire Arts Trail. It will be the first time I’ll have slapped my insides onto a wall for other people to look at and I am rather nervous about it, and if truth be told, rather excited too.

The event takes place here in Saltaire on 28-30 May. I’ll be in the Art Rooms in Salts Mill – just follow the signs to the Tourist Information Centre. The list of artists taking part in the Arts Trail has just been released. As well as the juried exhibitors in the Open Houses there will be local people opening up their homes and showing their work too. There is also the Makers Fair and lots of exhibitions and activities. In the Art Rooms I’ll be exhibiting alongside Janis Goodman, Salma Patel, Steve Rayner, Gemma Lacey, Dave Gowers, and the owner of the Art Rooms, Jacky Al-Samarraie. Do please come and say hello. Pictured below is one of Dave Gower’s amazing paintings; I can’t wait to see more.

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David Gowers, No 10

I’ve also been selected for Weave, a summer show at Craft in the Bay in Cardiff – it’ll explore the act of weaving across different mediums, not just with yarn, and I’ll share more about the exhibition in due course. It does sound rather exciting!

Cheerio for now and I hope to see you later this month x

Saying it with weft – a new tapestry finished

Putting weft in and out of warp, there’s only so much you can do without distorting the nature of the cloth. Whilst I’ve always tried to circumnavigate this rigidity by using textured weaves like soumak to create curves and flow, I’ve always felt I was somehow cheating the nature of the medium. But there are some weavers who seem able to just drip the weft from their fingertips and create incredibly expressive weavings; I’m thinking here of Finnish weaver Aino Kajaniemi, the twentieth century German weaver Johanna Schutz-Wolff and a weaver who I only know through a couple of small images of their tapestries, Rojane Lamego.

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The need to find a more expressive way to weave myself became increasingly apparent after embarking on the life drawing classes made freely available by Bradford College of Art. Turns out I wasn’t entirely rubbish at drawing. I learned I had scope to explore, that I needn’t jump on the first quarter-decent image I produced despite myself and subsequently devote the rest of my weaving life to it. I became much more liberated in the design stages, certainly less petrified. I’ve begun to draw for its own sake and not just to make something to weave. I also.learned when it came to drawing I leaned towards quick, loose, abstract images (and large-scale, gasp), and I wanted to find a way to translate that looseness in my weaving.

Initial samples focused on eccentric wefts, loose weaves, plain weaves, painted warps and textured surfaces, but I found I was still ducking away from what tapestry was. I was still hiding behind texture and gimmicks. I wanted to get back to basics; simple weft faced weaving. Writing this post I realise perhaps this is a result of my recent research into earlier tapestries.

Embrace insomnia is what is what I say, because the answer appeared in the wee hours one morning, in-between ‘did I close the freezer door properly’ and ‘when is the council tax due’. I had the answer all along, I had already woven the way I was seeking in the studies I had made for the DMV projects and the Hanging Tree tapestry. I reworked one of my sketches into a proper design, made the cartoon and worked some samples including the more complicated areas such as the face (below).

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I aimed to weave something where the figure and the background were intrinsic to one another, interwoven in design as well as structure, hoping this would make it more expressive than my previous tapestries.

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I also found myself finally being able to express something trapped for some time. A sonnet someone once shared with me came to mind as I was designing this (No Longer Mourn for Me), and I realised the figure was sinking into the blackness, but read differently, she was also emerging from it, and that was basically what I’ve been trying to say and failing miserably, as the graveyard of abandoned tapestries attests.

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I finished her today and I’m very pleased with the results. It took about three weeks to weave, but stupidly weaving 15+ hours a day, so probably more like five. She is 116cm x 82 cm, so smaller than what I normally go for, but she was a bit of a punt and I didn’t want to waste too much wool and warp in case she didn’t pan out. It was far more complicated than my previous tapestries but also far more addictive. I also found myself freely interpreting the original drawing at the loom which was a far more interesting way to work than being a slave to the cartoon.

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She’ll have to stay on the loom for a little while as there’s loads of left over warp to use up. But this piece, and others along similar lines, will be ready to show in May. I am very happy to say I’ve been selected as one of the exhibitors in the Open Houses Gallery at the Saltaire Arts Trail. I’ve never really had the chance to show my tapestries at this event before and I am really looking forward to the opportunity. I feel embarrassed to think of myself as an artist, but I do feel this piece is something I can be proud of and is unique to me and my voice. The Arts Trail takes place 28-30 May and the work of the artists will be on show in houses of the World Heritage Site and I’ll let you know where I’ll be as soon as I do.

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I am also thrilled to have been selected for Art in the Pen this year. This will take place in Skipton 13-14 August. I’ve also been selected for Crafted by Hand 5-6 November in Masham. I’ll update the events page on my website very soon, likewise workshops. It has been hard to plan for the year with my Fellowship travels in the offing, but as one of the places I want to visit won’t be open until the summer, it looks like I’ll be heading off later in the year. Obviously I want to go right now, now, now, but it does seem this will be more practical and give me a greater chance to prepare. It is Easter now and I am going to try to take a couple of days off. Whatever you have planned, I hope you enjoy it x

Sonnet 71: No Longer mourn for me (Shakespeare)

No longer mourn or me when I am dead

Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell

Give warning to the world that I am fled

From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell;

Nay, if you read this line, remember not

The hand that writ it; for I love you so,

That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,

If thinking on me then should make you woe.

O, if (I say) you look upon this verse,

When I (perhaps) compounded am with clay,

Do not so much as my poor name rehearse,

But let your love even with my life decay,

Lest the wise world should look into your moan,

And mock you with me after I am gone.

Coptic Tapestries at the British Museum

My blog has been quiet for a few weeks, for which I apologise, but I have been massively busy. I took some time out to deal with the domestic aftermath caused by the new loom that arrived earlier this year. It was the first time this year I have had breathing space long enough to tackle it  and that I can now get in some rooms which before I couldn’t even enter has proved a great relief to my sanity (before and after shots of my study below – don’t judge me!). It was hard to undertake such a major destashing but I feel  all the better for it, and not least because a lot of stuff was collected by Scrap Magic a local initiative in Bradford that provides craft resources for children’s activities.

fhdishfiI’ve been busy writing applications for various projects and I’ve also been hard at work on the first DMV project and will be warping up the loom this week to start the tapestry proper. I spent a good deal of time making samples, wanting to create a surface with some vigour, something to reflect ridge and furrow and earthworks.

IMG_6651It took longer than it should have to realise the answer was staring me in the face, by adjusting my sett and making a coarser weave I got just the texture I wanted. I’m looking forward to seeing how this works out on a large scale piece.

IMG_6639The colours have come together quite easily, which probably means something is wrong. Anyway we’ll see what happens once it is on the loom

IMG_6668 IMG_6671Yesterday I went to London for a committee meeting with the Heritage Crafts Association. I had just enough time to nip into the British Museum. I was almost scuppered by the most horrendous queue due to bag checks but kindly one of the guards told me about the entrance round the back and I got in in no time.

Coptic TapestryCoptic TapestryI was heading for the Coptic tapestries, the Copts being Christians in Roman Egypt from the 4th century AD onwards. They are famous for their textiles which have mostly come from burials and have survived due to the dry conditions. The photographs were taken through glass with an ipad so I know you will forgive me for their quality.

Coptic Tapestry

Coptic TapestryI was surprised, seeing them in the flesh, how finely woven they were – as a guide the medallions are roughly a handspan in width. And how vibrant are they? Take a moment to remember someone spun and dyed these yarns around 1500 years ago (and yes, those are my legs int he reflection above, I have very shapely pins).

Coptic TapestryMany of the examples on display like the first two above were appliquéd onto linen tunics. But in another example the linen warp used for the tapestry was doubled up. It was then split, doubling the sett, and used to form the tabby ground. The tapestry was integral to the cloth. The weft incidently, is wool.

Coptic Tapestry

Coptic TapestryThe use of soumak was heavily evident, outlining various elements in the border and main figures.

Coptic TapestryCoptic TapestryCoptic TapestryCoptic TapestryThe tapestries were behind glass, but it did mean one could get very close (except those near the floor and which would have involved getting down on one’s hands and knees (!!!)) and the area was well lit so it was fabulous to see these tapestries in the flesh. If I am totally honest they aren’t really my cup of tea aesthetically, but they are growing on me, and it is impossible not to marvel at the stagering technical expertise behind them, or their vibrancy, or their survival. If you ever get a chance to see them , I whole-heartedly recommend them.

I’ll try not to leave it so long until next time. Ta ra x