A Month in the Life of a Tapestry Weaver

Since getting back from New York things have been pretty manic and I am only now managing to grab some time with you, so I am sorry this is a bit of a round-up post.

I was, alas, too jet-lagged and exhausted to make it to the Heritage Craft Association’s launch of the Radcliffe Red List of Endangered Crafts at the House of Lords. The HCA has been undertaking magnificent research identifying UK crafts most at risk. The resulting database is an amazing resource and overview; I do encourage you to have a look. I’m terribly honoured to be one of their trustees, but have been too wrapped up with Winston Churchill to get involved myself, but did witness the amazing hard work and dedication that went into the project and the launch. For such a small organisation I am incessantly in awe of all they do.

A few days later was the HCA’s conference in London, I went down the day before and meant to visit the Dovecot’s new tapestry at the National Gallery but in the end got to the hotel and slept – the bed was rather good! There was an amazing line up the next day including the key note speaker, Kaffee Fassett, a man who can find the most amazing palettes everywhere as his colourful slides showed (below). I first went to one of his talks twenty or so years ago, so it was wonderful to hear him again.

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All the talkers were exemplary, and I learned heaps. Of particular note was the Queen’s wheelwright, Greg Rowland talking about some of the challenges craft practitioners face taking on an apprentice. It was incredibly interesting – and yes, moving – to see their relationship develop and someone bloom into a young man and spectacular craftsman in their own right. Lisa Hammond’s apprentice and Instagram super star Florian Gadsby gave a fascinating talk on the importance of social media to practitioners, and especially Instagram, a platform perfect for crafts folk. He stressed the importance of not just sticking up a picture and fleeing, but rather to take time to explore and share one’s thoughts and processes regarding one’s work. I have been inspired to try to do the same, posting daily and being more explicit in what I am doing and why. If you follow me on Facebook, I am sorry for the relative silence of late, but this is where you can find me. I floundered during a week of meltdown (see below) but have found the experience very useful and rewarding.

I also headed up to Blackburn in Lancashire. A manufacturer of rug making looms (Cobble van de Wiele) is interested in using some of my designs to make some show-pieces to demonstrate the versatility of their looms. I was invited up to the factory to discuss it and see what the looms can do. If you are a regular reader you will know I am a bit of a tapestry purist, but it was clear that the resulting textiles would be entirely different to my hand woven tapestries, something in their own right, rather than a cheap knock-off, and actually it is going to be incredibly exciting to see how my techniques might get translated by the looms. They were things of absolute beauty, the mechanism was like a ballet of needles and thread. I love the idea of the mixing of the modern and ancient techniques. My grandfather was an engineer and I couldn’t help thinking how much he would have loved it. Anyway, fingers crossed we can make it work!

Capture

I also headed up to the Platform Gallery in Clitheroe with my long suffering friend who mistakenly once offered to help move some tapestries around and has been paying for it ever since. I needed to pick up some pieces that were on display during their Craft Open exhibition, it was also a great chance to see again the space I’ll need to fill for my exhibition running alongside the Craft Open next year. Eeeeeeven better it was a chance to spend my voucher which I won as part of the Selectors Prize. I treated myself to a pair of ge-orgeous earrings by Kate Rhodes. I am swinging my hair about quite a bit now to show them off. I love the colours and shapes. I don’t usually wear jewellery, so it is quite nice to feel like a girl after all! I did try to take my own picture, but it is very hard to take a selfie of one’s ear!

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Of course in amongst all this I had to get ready for the Saltaire Arts Trail. I love this event, I’ve grown up with it as an artist, and it is such a great privilege to chat to visitors. If you haven’t been, houses and other venues across the World Heritage Site are opened as mini galleries, there’s also a makers fair, events and exhibitions and workshops. I have been very lucky to have been selected to do it pretty regularly, but a big part of that is having new work to show, a big ask when it takes months to make a tapestry.

Whilst I hadn’t shown Delia Jo before, I knew I had make new work. I was also conscious that I needed to find a way to digest all I had seen in New York. I have written up my notes and I’ve been sorting through the photographs but I also needed to interpret it all on the loom. I don’t like weaving small, but there was no time to do anything else. One answer was to start working on some samples for a larger piece. Obviously an overriding element of medieval tapestries is their narrative nature, and this is something I have been keen to explore and not least because thanks to my Fellowship I am much more confident that I can weave whatever I choose to draw.

Chrissie Freeth Face Sample

I decided to kick off with some faces, my theory being if I can manage those then anything was possible. I still wanted to keep an element of the techniques I’ve been developing in my previous work, and there was as much unweaving as weaving to try to make it work, but I did feel much more liberated and unshackled at the loom. I suppose a big part of that was being more relaxed when it came to working with the original design, being more disposed to interpret it as I saw fit, rather than just copying it. Before I would have to weave big to capture every nuance of the original, but now I should be able to get full figures on the larger loom.

I couldn’t just stick a small tapestry on the wall, for me tapestries are mural. I thought if I put them in a frame I wouldn’t be pretending they were anything other than samples. However by this time, a week to go, I had also decided that the samples were rubbish, and I was rubbish, and tapestry was stupid and I was wasting my life (it was a bad weekend). I was making the frames myself and managed to successful muck up totally the sawing of the wood. Without the frames I couldn’t show them. I would be saved the ridicule.

Chrissie Freeth Face Sample 2

I spend most of the week with my head in the sand, the Arts Trail looming. I suppose part of me was reliant on the thought that panic would be the mother of invention. The only other answer I could come up with was a new pair of jeggings. I was walking back from my shopping expedition when I bumped into another artist in the village and berated them for being so organised in the run up to the trail. They promptly offered me some spare frames they were in two minds about using and which might do. SAVED – they were perfect!!!!! I didn’t have time to do the backs of the frames so wouldn’t be able to sell them, but at least I wouldn’t have an empty wall. Now I wasn’t feeling so sorry for myself I also realised I had some smaller archaeology-inspired pieces that I hadn’t shown before, and I could also throw in No Longer Mourn in the hope no one would remember it from last year.

Chrissie Freeth Tapestries Saltaire Arts Trail 1

I was in a lovely house, beautiful, large and high dark walls, perfect for my work – I was incredibly lucky! It was the home of Jolly Bean Roastery and I was showing with an artist I already knew through a mutual friend, the wonderful print maker Cath Brooke. I began to think that I shouldn’t show the two faces after all, thinking perhaps they were too rubbish, but there were a couple of spaces that needed filling.

Chrissie Freeth Tapestries Saltaire Arts Trail

Although both were labelled NFS, they did gather quite a bit of attention, and requests were made, despite the framing, to buy them. They were both sold before the morning of the first day was out. They remained on show though and continued to generate interest and comment, and it became clear that I needed to get over myself and that the way forward for me was glaringly obvious.

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The Arts Trail is fabulous for connecting with fellow artists. I don’t usually get out to see other work as one feels one ought to be with one’s own work, but this year I was determined to see the other venues. Of particular note was Hannah Robson who weaves with metals to create spectacular sculptural pieces, I loved the juxtaposition of the more formal woven elements with the more open areas. One of my favourite artists is Paula Dunn (and frame offering hero), who has been working in cold wax and it was great to see her eye for spectacular landscapes translated this way. Ian Burdall creates very evocative maritime paintings and is again defo worth a gander. Textile artists Claire Wellesley-Smith and Hannah Lamb followed up their work last year, Lasting Impressions, by using weaving to archive some of the findings. It was great to see a row of beautiful Harris Looms in the spinning room at the top of Salts Mill and to see folk weaving on them. The results looked lovely. Such a great idea.

I am determined to have the weekend off (blog posting and the reading of some meeting papers excepted). I knew if I don’t fill it with something I’d just end up weaving so last night blew the dust off my needle case and transferred one of the tapestry designs I’ve been working on this week onto some cloth.

Chrissie Freeth Embroidery Sample

One thing I did do in that week before the Arts Trail was to set up a workbench just for sketching – why I never did that before is a mystery, but it is making a big difference having a dedicated space with everything I need at hand. It is good having this space away from the looms too, gives me space to think just on the sketching and not the weaving.

Art in the Pen in Skipton in August is the next event, I am working on designs for that and am very excited by the possibilities. I could do with an extra month though! I also need to get my Fellowship trips to Germany and Switzerland organised. But for now, needle and thread in the sunny yarden is calling. Ttfn xxx

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2 thoughts on “A Month in the Life of a Tapestry Weaver

  1. Wow, your work looks absolutely fantastic in that house. The frames really seem to emphasise the solidity and scale of the forms by enclosing them. Amazing what an unforeseen difference things like that can make. Love the earrings too – big fan of Kate’s work!

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