Airlyne Rug Maker – Instructions

This is in response to Caffy’s question re my earlier post.

Below is the instruction booklet – ignore comepletely what I said in the comments; the eye of the needle faces the way you are heading. My memory is demonstrably rubbish. If you click on an image below a larger readable version should appear.

This, by the way, is what the rug maker should look like once it is assembled. The forked oblique crank attached to the foot strap hooks onto a screw behind the needle and is then screwed into the  post on the right. It is then connected to the main plate by the spring.

I’ve also uploaded a quick video of the rug maker in operation.  I don’t know how useful it will be, but fingers crossed. I apologise for the quality, I recorded it on my phone. And perhaps I should have turned my radio off! If I can help further, just ask.

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8 thoughts on “Airlyne Rug Maker – Instructions

  1. Hi loved the info on the Arlynn rug maker have tried to watch video but its not there anymore, is there any chance you could repost it

    1. Hi George – thanks for alerting me to this – have absolutely no idea where the video has gone – and alas I cannot access my account for some reason to sort it. I’ve looked for a copy of the video on my hard drive to no avail. I’ll try and get another one made lickerty split and will message here when I have done it. Sorry about this!

      1. hi
        I have just won a Airlyne rug maker on ebay cant wait for it to arrive i hope it is as good as it looks and works as easy , any luck with the video.

        George

  2. I am very, very new to rug making and have just purchased an Airlyne Rug Maker, without the final page in the instructions. I have tried to print/copy the one above but having no success, could anyone suggest where I may be going wrong please?

  3. The Airlyne Home Rugmaker was invented and manufactured by Ted Jones Director managing Slater and Wheeler, Abergele, North Wales around 1948 . The invention helped the small factory and jobs to survive the difficult immediate post war period after building precision parts for Lancasters bombers etc The factory went on for another 30 or so years but failed after Ted’s departure. A bit of history and good example of an old time engineer fighting back against all the odds.

  4. Just to let you know that I also have an Airlyne rag rug tool that I inherited when my grandmother died in 1979. It didn’t come with any instructions so this was very useful.

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